What to expect from a healing session

27 11 2010

“I am sorry for coming when I am such a mess,” the man coming in the door said.

“It seems like everyone who crosses my door says that,” I replied.

This one factor, feeling out of control, unites most of the people I see. As Americans, we share a cultural value which pressures us to power through our life, ignoring our pain. It isn’t until we are tied in knots, often by yet another difficulty (i.e. divorce, unemployment, medical issue) that we seek help. We often only seek non-traditional intervention when every other thing we have tried has failed. It I no wonder that people come to a shamanic practitioner with feelings of embarrassment, failure and even shame at needing help.

It is very good news that people universally leave feeling better because:

  • They have immediate confirmation that there is something to this non-traditional stuff.
  • They typically receive specific information, energy and/or spiritual healing.
  • Most importantly, they leave aware that another human being isn’t afraid of their pain and will stand in it with them.  I’m not an energy vampire, wallowing in their pain, but a brief open-hearted sharing allows a person to let down their defenses.
  • By letting down defenses a patient releases a burst of creative energy in which healing and the awareness of the possibility of healing is received.
  • They become awareness of a context for their experience.

This doesn’t mean that everyone leaves cured of all their problems. However, they typically move forward unburdened and hopeful. I often don’t see a patient again for several months and when I do, they tell me that things are going better, even when they are in a difficult period of their life. They often attribute part, or much of this, to their experience of shamanic healing.





Deities, Rituals, and Healing Forms

17 11 2010

I continue to receive questions about Aama’s healings. Here are some of my humble explanations with a disclaimer directing you to further research for more complete information.

Aama is a Buddhist. In Nepal Hinduism and Buddhism coexist. Often Buddhists and Hindus are seen worshipping side by side at the same shrine, each calling the deity to whom the shrine is dedicated, by a different name.  Hinduism considers other religions part of Hinduism (it seems to me that they are saying, of course all religion is in the name of the same God). Hinduism recognizes many deities as representations of different aspects of God.

People have asked about deities Aama referred to.  Some she referred to by their Hindu names.

Aama referred to the Hindu trinity of Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva. They are respectively the creator, preserver and destroyer of the universe.  These quick descriptions only hint at their many aspects. Shiva, for example, can be not only a destroyer but also a transformer and can be called upon in a situation where transformation is the goal.

Aama also spoke of Kal Bairab – the destroyer and Swet Brairab, the protector.

She frequently mentioned the use of sang, which is incense, as part of a prayer ritual.

Other than specific rituals such as the Man Chinni Exorcism rite, I don’t believe I have seen Aama do the same healing ritual twice. As with most shamanic work, the job of the shaman is to become the hollow bone. S/he is thus free of any preconceived idea of what work is needed and can receive information, filter it as little as possible, and deliver it to the patient.  As Aama demonstrated, this work can include divination (readings), spiritual healing (either through the direct physical effort of the shaman or through spirit helpers who may sometimes merge with the shaman), energy work, suggestions for self-healing and spiritual growth practices, and/or a blessing/prayer ritual.





Basics of De-possession

3 01 2010

De-possession is the act of exorcising attached discarnate human spirits or nonhuman spirits, which are attached to living people.

Effects of possession may include unexplained mood swings and behavior, chronic pains and illnesses, mental illness, suicidal urges, suppressed hostility or guilt, and/or drug and alcohol abuse.

Possessing spirits are deceased humans who have not yet departed the earthly plane (see information on psycho-pomp). They attach themselves to a family member or a person who is weakened by substance abuse, hostility, or severe illness, or who has unresolved past-life karmic issues. They may also be nonhuman spirits including elementals and confused or un-evolved entities.

Results of de-possession may include: a relief of symptoms, a sense of empowerment. the ability to make progress in one’s life, and make improvements to present relationships.  It can be an opportunity to see life from a new prospective if one is willing to do the work to integrate a new self-awareness.

The method of de-possession I utilize, through the intersession of compassionate healing spirits, is a Tibetan bombo method. The possessing entity is lured from the victim to a place which is better for the entity, rather than forced or shocked. It includes the opportunity to gain insights as to why the possession occurred and how to avoid a recurrence. Each ceremony is unique and may include elements from other traditions.